LUNG CANCER FACTS

1̲0̲0̲%̲ interesting FACTS about Lung Cancer (Oncology) ❤ Facts about SCLC, Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), Metastatic, Adenocarcinoma, survival rate ➜➜



MORTALITY – LUNG CANCER FACTS

  1. Nearly 160,000 lives are lost annually.
  2. 158,080 people in the U.S. will die of lung cancer in 2016.
  3. More than the other 3 leading cancers combined (breast cancer 40,890, prostate cancer 26,120, colorectal cancer 49,190) – it accounts for 27% of all cancer deaths.
  4. More than the next 3 deadliest cancers combined (colorectal cancer 49,190, breast cancer 40,890, pancreatic cancer 41,780) – it accounts for 27% of all cancer deaths.
  5. Lung cancer kills 433 people every day.
  6. Every 3.3 minutes, someone in the U.S. dies of lung cancer.
  7. Lung cancer kills almost twice as many women as breast cancer and more than three times as many men as prostate cancer.
  8. Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer among women in the United States, surpassing breast cancer in 1987.
  9. It’s estimated that more than 72,000 American women will die of lung cancer in 2016.
  10. Lung cancer kills 198 women every day – 8 per hour, one death every 7 minutes.
  11. During the past 39 years, the lung cancer death rate has fallen 29% among men while increasing 102% among women. Since the peak death rate for men in 1990, the death rate for men has fallen 41%. Since the peak death rate for women in 2002, the death rate for women has fallen 15%.

INCIDENCE – LUNG CANCER FACTS

  1. 1 in 15 people in the U.S. will be diagnosed with lung cancer in their lifetime—1 in 14 men and 1 in 17 women.
  2. 224,390 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer in 2016.
  3. 615 people will be diagnosed each day.
  4. 26 people will be diagnosed each hour.
  5. Every 2 ½ minutes someone in the U.S. is told that he or she has lung cancer.
  6. The median age at diagnosis is 70 and 69% of lung cancer diagnoses are in people 65 or older.
  7. Every 5 minutes, a women in the U.S. is told that she has lung cancer.
  8. Only 16% of people will be diagnosed in the earliest stage, when the disease is most treatable.
  9. Over the last 39 years, the rate of new lung cancer cases has fallen 32% among men while increasing 94% among women. Since the peak rate for men in 1984, the rate of new cases for men has dropped 41%. Since the peak rate of new cases for women in 1998, the rate of new cases for women has fallen 10%.
  10. There were 130,659 lung cancer deaths due to smoking each year from 2005-2009 and 7,330 from secondhand smoke exposure in 2006.
  11. Radon causes about 21,000 lung cancer deaths each year, making it the second leading cause of lung cancer death.
  12. The relative risk from smoking has increased over time, despite a decrease in smoking prevalence and the average number of cigarettes consumed per smoker. It has increased by close to tenfold for women, compared to more than doubling for men, meaning women and men are now equally likely to die from a smoking-related disease.

lung cancer facts

SURVIVAL – LUNG CANCER FACTS

  1. Lung cancer has the lowest 5-year survival rate of the other most common cancers: only 18% (compared to prostate at 99%, breast at 90%, and colorectal 65%).
  2. Half of women (50.1%) diagnosed with lung cancer will survive one year. Only one in five women (22%) will survive five years.
  3. Among women, the lifetime risk of dying from lung cancer is 82% greater than the risk of dying from the next most likely cancer, breast.
  4. The risk of developing lung cancer in a woman’s lifetime is approximately 1 in 17 (6.04 %).
  5. Lung cancer diagnosed and treated at an early stage has a much higher survival rate, but most cases are not diagnosed until later stages.
  6. Only 18% of lung cancer cases among women are diagnosed early (localized/stage 1).
  7. If lung cancer is caught before it spreads, the likelihood of surviving 5 years or more improves to 55%.
  8. Early detection, by low-dose CT screening, can decrease lung cancer mortality by 14%-20% among high-risk populations

lung cancer facts

CAUSES AND COSTS – LUNG CANCER FACTS

  1. Smoking isn’t the only cause of lung cancer. Other known causes include exposure to secondhand smoke, air pollution, radon, and asbestos.
  2. Major prospective studies support the relationship between particle pollution and lung cancer.
  3. Employees who smoke cost their employer nearly $6,000 more each year compared to nonsmoking employees.
  4. $13.4 billion was spent on lung cancer care in 2015.
  5. More was spent on care in the last year of life ($5.5 billion) for lung cancer than any other cancer in 2015.
  6. The $39 billion in lost productivity due to lung cancer deaths was more than the next four costliest cancers combined. It was the costliest cancer in terms of lost productivity, and accounted for 27% of the total cost of lost productivity for all cancers.

lung cancer facts

LUNG CANCER FACTS:

  1. Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer of both men and women in America.
  2. Cancer of the lungs takes more lives every year than breast, colon, and prostate cancer combined. Create and share homemade cards encouraging a smoker in your life to quit. Sign up for Quitters Always Win
  3. Nearly 400,000 people in the US are living with lung cancer.
  4. 81% of those living with lung cancer are over the age 60. The disease ails the elderly the most severely.
  5. The survival rate of lung cancer (17%) is drastically lower than breast cancer, with a survival rate of 90% and prostate with nearly 100%.

10 important and interesting lung cancer facts:

  1. Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women (not including skin cancer).
  2. Lung cancer accounts for about 14 percent of all new cancers.
  3. This year, 116,470 men and 109,690 women will be newly diagnosed with lung cancer in the United States.
  4. About 160,340 people will die from lung cancer in the United States this year.
  5. About two out of three people diagnosed with lung cancer are 65 or older.
  6. Fewer than 2 percent of all cases are found in people younger than 45.
  7. The chance that a man will develop lung cancer in his lifetime is about 1 in 13 and for a woman, 1 in 16.*
  8. African American men are about 40 percent more likely to develop lung cancer than Caucasian men. The rate is about the same in African American women and in Caucasian women.
  9. The lung cancer rate has been dropping among men for many years and is just beginning to drop in women after a long period of rising.
  10. Although lung cancer is a serious illness, some people are cured. More than 350,000 people alive today have been diagnosed with lung cancer at some point. With diagnosis, it’s important to seek support.

*these numbers include both smokers and non-smokers. For smokers the risk is much higher.


Key Statistics for Lung Cancer

Most lung cancer statistics include both small cell and non-small cell lung cancers.

How common is lung cancer?

Lung cancer (both small cell and non-small cell) is the second most common cancer in both men and women (not counting skin cancer). In men, prostate cancer is more common, while in women breast cancer is more common. About 14% of all new cancers are lung cancers.

The American Cancer Society’s estimates for lung cancer in the United States for 2017 are:



  • About 222,500 new cases of lung cancer (116,990 in men and 105,510 in women)
  • About 155,870 deaths from lung cancer (84,590 in men and 71,280 in women)

Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women; about 1 out of 4 cancer deaths are from lung cancer. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined.

Lung cancer mainly occurs in older people. About 2 out of 3 people diagnosed with lung cancer are 65 or older, while less than 2% are younger than 45. The average age at the time of diagnosis is about 70.

Lifetime chance of getting lung cancer

Overall, the chance that a man will develop lung cancer in his lifetime is about 1 in 14; for a woman, the risk is about 1 in 17. These numbers include both smokers and non-smokers. For smokers the risk is much higher, while for non-smokers the risk is lower.

Black men are about 20% more likely to develop lung cancer than white men. The rate is about 10% lower in black women than in white women. Both black and white women have lower rates than men, but the gap is closing. The lung cancer rate has been dropping among men over the past few decades, but only for about the last decade in women.

Statistics on survival in people with lung cancer vary depending on the stage (extent) of the cancer when it is diagnosed. For survival statistics based on the stage of the cancer, see Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Survival Rates By Stage.

Despite the very serious prognosis (outlook) of lung cancer, some people with earlier stage cancers are cured. More than 430,000 people alive today have been diagnosed with lung cancer at some point.

More Lung Cancer images


LUNG CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS, HOSPITALS, CLINICS in USA:

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkanzas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Misouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dacota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennesee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washingtom, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming


Sources:
http://www.webmd.com/lung-cancer/guide/lung-cancer-overview-facts
https://health.clevelandclinic.org/2012/11/10-lung-cancer-facts-2/
https://www.dosomething.org/facts/11-facts-about-lung-cancer
https://www.lungcancerfoundation.org/about-us/lung-cancer-facts/
https://www.cancer.org/cancer/non-small-cell-lung-cancer/about/key-statistics.html

Cancer: symptoms, signs, treatment, stages